Eight Associate Monitors will oversee the ten topic areas set out in the consent decree: (1) community policing; (2) impartial policing; (3) crisis intervention; (4) use of force; (5) recruitment, hiring, and promotion; (6) training; (7) supervision; (8) officer wellness and support; (9) accountability and transparency; and (10) data collection, analysis, and management.

Our Associate Monitors will oversee these topics: Dr. Theron Bowman (Training and Recruitment, Hiring, and Promotion), Harold Medlock (Transparency and Accountability), Paul Evans (Use of Force), Will Johnson (Supervisions and Officer Wellness and Support), Steve Rickman (Community Policing), Dr. Dennis Rosenbaum (Impartial Policing), Julie Solomon (Crisis Intervention), and Dr. Scott Decker (Data Collection, Analysis and Management). Learn more about our Associate Monitors below.


Stephen Rickman, Associate Monitor for Community Policing

Stephen Rickman, MA, is an expert in police-community relations. He has worked for over 20 years in high-level positions in public safety and community support. Mr. Rickman is currently an Associate Monitor on the Independent Monitoring Team for the Albuquerque, New Mexico, Police Department’s Court Approved Settlement Agreement and a former Director of the Department of Justice (DOJ) Weed and Seed Program. He is also a former Division Director for the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance, and a member of the Federal Government’s Senior Executive Service. Mr. Rickman served as the Technical Advisor to President Obama’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing.

Steve also has experience working in Chicago, having overseen several Chicago-area Weed and Seed sites. Finally, Steve’s parents and grandparents were Chicagoans, and he has spent time in the city throughout his life. As the Associate Monitor for Community Policing, Mr. Rickman will work closely with the Community Engagement Team.

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Dennis Rosenbaum, Associate Monitor for Impartial Policing

Dennis Rosenbaum, PhD, is the Associate Monitor for Impartial Policing. He is Professor Emeritus of Criminology, Law and Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). At UIC, he was Head of the Department of Criminology, Law and Justice, Director of Graduate Studies, and Director of the Center for Research in Law and Justice. In 2014 Dr. Rosenbaum was elected the first Chair of the Division of Policing, American Society of Criminology. In 2015, he testified before the President’s Task Force on ways to improve public trust in the police. Dr. Rosenbaum currently serves as the Compliance Officer for the Settlement Agreement in Portland, Oregon.  

Dr. Rosenbaum is an expert on the Chicago Police Department, where he has evaluated several programs. His areas of expertise include procedural justice and impartial policing, community policing, hot spots policing, police accountability, police training, and program evaluation methods. Funded by the National Institute of Justice, Dr. Rosenbaum directed the National Police Research Platform in 100 cities to advance the state of knowledge and practice in policing. Dr. Rosenbaum currently serves on the National Research Advisory Board for the Police Executive Research Forum and the Measures for Justice Policing Council. As the Associate Monitor for Impartial Policing, Dr. Rosenbaum will work closely with the Community Engagement Team.

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Julie Solomon, Associate Monitor for Crisis Intervention

Julie Solomon, MBA, LSCSW is the Associate Monitor for Crisis Intervention. Ms. Solomon has broad experience at the local, state, and national levels and has done expansive work at the intersection of Justice and Behavioral Health. Ms. Solomon has been recognized for her leadership in building community collaboration, integrating systems, changing state law, and improving programs to promote best practices to respond to persons experiencing behavioral health crises. Ms. Solomon served as Chief Administrative Officer with CIT International, Inc. and as Vice President of Emergency Stabilization Services at Wyandot Mental Health Center in Kansas City, Kansas. While there, Ms. Solomon was instrumental in developing a robust Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Program, a police/mental health co-responder program, Jail Diversion Program, Justice Involved Case Management Team, a 24/7/365 crisis center, and a misdemeanor and felony behavioral health court. She served on the leadership team of the Kansas State CIT council, the greater Kansas City Metro CIT council, and as a CIT International Board Member. Ms. Solomon is currently serving as Senior Vice President of Community Integrated Health with the Kansas City YMCA.

Ms. Solomon’s career focuses on health, behavioral health, trauma informed care, system collaboration, and innovation. She has been a Sequential Intercept Mapping Recipient (SIMS), a Bureau of Justice grant recipient, and a Trauma Informed Care in the Criminal Justice System grant recipient. She has also been invited to present nationally on a wide range of topics, including “Creating Collaborative Partners with Law Enforcement and Mental Health”; “Responding to the President’s Task Force Report on 21st Century Policing”; “Program Sustainability”; “Designing Effective Law Enforcement: Behavioral Health Partnerships for People with Mental Illness; “Changing State Laws to improve CIT and Client Care: Emergency Observation and Treatment”; “Criminal Justice-Behavioral Health Partnerships: Promoting Integrated Healthcare”; and at the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) promoting the “One Mind Campaign.”

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Commissioner (Ret.) Paul Evans, Associate Monitor for Use of Force

Commissioner (Ret.) Paul Evans, JD, is the Associate Monitor for Use of Force. Commissioner Evans is an expert on police use of force. He served as Commissioner of the Boston, Massachusetts, Police Department from 1993 to 2003. He then served four years as the Director of the Police Standards Unit of Britain’s Home Office, assessing and improving the performance of British police forces. Commissioner Evans is a U.S. Marine Corps veteran and has served on the Board of the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF).

During Commissioner Evans’s more than 30-year career with the Boston Police Department, he held every civil service rank and command staff position from patrol officer to Commissioner. He addressed difficult policy issues concerning use of deadly force and protection of civil liberties, created innovative strategies that dramatically reduced crime, and engaged communities to reduce tensions and build community collaborations. Commissioner Evans consults with law enforcement agencies across the country on police operations and strategy. As Associate Monitor for Use of Force, Commissioner Evans will work closely with the Community Engagement Team.

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Theron Bowman, Associate Monitor for Recruitment, Hiring, and Promotion and Training

Theron Bowman, Ph.D., is the Associate Monitor for Recruitment, Hiring, and Promotion and Training. Dr. Bowman began his public service career in 1983 as an officer with the Arlington, Texas, Police Department, and served in numerous positions before becoming chief in 1999. He later served for five years as Arlington’s Deputy City Manager and Director of Public Safety before retiring in 2017.

Dr. Bowman has led, managed, and participated in police practices investigations and audits in multiple locations, including Albuquerque, New Mexico; Baltimore, Maryland; Battle Creek, Michigan; Chicago, Illinois; Cleveland, Ohio; Los Angeles County, California; Maricopa County, Arizona; Newark, New Jersey; New Orleans, Louisiana; and Seattle, Washington. He is a federal court-appointed consent decree deputy monitor in Baltimore and a multidisciplinary law enforcement expert on the New Orleans and Memphis, Tennessee, monitoring teams. Dr. Bowman has received much recognition throughout his career, including being named the African American Peace Officer Association of Arlington “Officer of the Year,” receiving Proclamation of Achievement from the Texas State Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives, and being designated a University of Texas at Arlington “University Scholar and Distinguished Alumni.”

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Chief Will Johnson, Associate Monitor for Officer Wellness and Support and for Supervision

Chief Will Johnson, MA, is the Associate Monitor for Officer Wellness and Support and for Supervision. Chief Johnson is an accomplished agent for police organizational change. Chief Johnson began his career twenty-five years ago and is currently Chief of the Arlington, Texas, Police Department (APD). Chief Johnson has law enforcement experience in field operations, investigations, homeland security, special events, and police administration. During his time as Chief, he is championing innovative approaches to integrate procedural justice in officer safety and wellness. Specifically, Chief Johnson expanded APD’s Critical Incident Stress Management team. That team—which consists of mental health professionals and peer support members trained in crisis intervention—provides resources and peer support to officers after critical incidents and traumatic events, including those that occur both in employees’ personal and professional lives.

Chief Johnson also holds national and international roles in professional organizations. He is a Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) Executive Fellow, serves on the Board of Directors for the Major Cities Chiefs Association, and is currently Vice President for the International Association of Chiefs of Police. He is the immediate past Chair of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Human and Civil Rights Committee, where he testified as an expert before Congress and has served as a Department of Justice Subject Matter Expert addressing collaborative reform projects in North Carolina, Florida, and California. In his role at PERF, Chief Johnson developed a use-of-force accountability model that focused on bridging informational silos within departments to create a culture of integrity. Chief Johnson is also featured in a recent Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) video, which profiles his agency’s advances in community policing and the transparency with which his agency handled an officer-involved shooting.

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Chief (Ret.) Harold Medlock, Associate Monitor for Transparency and Accountability

Chief (Ret.) Harold Medlock is the Associate Monitor for Transparency and Accountability. Chief Medlock served as Chief of Police of the Fayetteville, North Carolina, Police Department for nearly four years, retiring in January 2107. Before that, he served over two decades with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North Carolina, Police Department, attaining the rank of Deputy Chief in 2008. Further, Chief Medlock served as National Special Security Event (NSSE) Co-Chair for the 2012 Democratic National Convention. Chief Medlock earned an MBA degree from Pfeiffer University, and is a graduate of the FBI National Executive Institute, the Federal Bureau of Investigations National Academy, and the Senior Management Institute for Police.

Chief Medlock has also actively served on a number of law enforcement and social issue boards including the North Carolina Governor’s Crime Commission, the North Carolina Police Executives Association, the North Carolina Criminal Justice Training and Standards Commission, and the North Carolina Commission for Racial and Ethnic Disparity. Chief Medlock presented written and verbal testimony for the President’s Task Force for 21st Century Policing and is a consultant for the national Body Worn Camera, Strategies for Police Innovation, and Project Safe Neighborhoods technical assistance initiatives.

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Scott H. Decker, Associate Monitor for Data Collection, Analysis, and Management

Scott H. Decker, PhD, is the Associate Monitor for Data Collection, Analysis, and Management. Dr. Decker has worked with law enforcement agencies in many different capacities for 30 years. He received the Chief’s award in St. Louis, Missouri, in 2005 for his work analyzing data to improve problem-solving within the department. Dr. Decker served for five years as a member of the Arizona Police Officer Standards and Training Board and was a core member of the Project Safe Neighborhoods Training and Policy Teams, working with law enforcement to integrate data-driven solutions into their approach to dealing with gun violence.

Further, Dr. Decker wrote the Guidebook for Local Law Enforcement Strategies to Address Gang Crime for the DOJ COPS Office. Dr. Decker has led the team that analyzes traffic stop data in Missouri for 17 years. He is the recently retired Foundation Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University and currently serves as a Senior Advisor at CNA. He also recently served as the Chicago Police Department subject matter expert for the DOJ Strategies for Policing Innovation initiative.